ANN ARBOR 

Ann Arbor is known as the, “Sizzle in Southeastern Michigan” and one of the nation’s fastest growing high-tech cities. You’ll find an incomparable quality of life and a vast assortment of exciting things to do, places to visit and attractions to discover.  

Dine in more than 200 restaurants, from Michigan’s finest to late-night hot dog stands, offering every cuisine under the sun, from Italian to Vietnamese. Thrill to a wealth of fine shopping, museums, galleries, theaters, and clubs, whatever your interest, there’s something to engage you.  

Outdoor enthusiasts can play a vast array of recreational activities in beautiful parks while sports lovers can cheer on teams at both the University of Michigan and Eastern Michigan University as well as the Rangers, Tigers and NBA champion Pistons in Detroit. Ann Arbor also hosts fascinating special events throughout the year, including drawing music lovers to the annual Ann Arbor Blues and Jazz Festival and culture mavens to the Ann Arbor Art Fair. 

The University of Michigan brings much diversity to Ann Arbor's population and culture, although this city of more than 100,000 people is much more than just a college town. There are four sections of downtown, each with its own character and distinctive collection of restaurants, stores and attractions including the Main Street area, the State Street Area, the South University area the Kerrytown Historic District.  

Ann Arbor has a wealth of museums, libraries and educational attractions many of which are associated with the U of M. Included among them are the University of Michigan Exhibit Museum of Natural History and Planetarium, which houses the state's largest collection of dinosaur bones and the University of Michigan Museum of Art, home to nearly 14,000 works of art from around the world.  

Don’t miss a visit to the Washtenaw County Historical Society Museum on Main Street, which relates area history from the time of the Indians and settlers to the present. You’ll also want to tour the Gerald R. Ford Library, the presidential library of the 38th commander-in-chief and University of Michigan graduate.

The city's performing arts offerings include the Ann Arbor Symphony, directed by Arie Lipsky as well as the Kerrytown Concert house, a restored 1850s house that hosts many musical performances. The Performance Network, an award-winning theater company located downtown will impress you with their off-Broadway style productions presented in an intimate 139-seat theater. In addition to its cultural offerings, Ann Arbor boasts dozens of nightspots and entertainment venues that reflect the exciting diversity of this vibrant city.  

There are wonderful neighborhoods filled with family homes and superb investment properties like apartments and flats that will never be vacant. Roads are excellent, healthcare is tops (the U of M Hospital is one of the best in the nation), education is a priority and folks are friendly and helpful. Make your move to Ann Arbor and enjoy some of that “sizzle” for yourself. 

LOCATION 

Ann Arbor is set in gorgeous Washtenaw County, located in the southeast corner of Michigan. It is commonly referred to as the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area and includes that neighbouring town in its Metro Region. The name Washtenaw is Chippewa for "grand river," which the native tribes called the majestic Huron River that flows through the area and is the northern border of the city. The Huron today remains a county showpiece surrounded by a carefully developed park system making it available for all to enjoy.  

Ann Arbor is 27 square miles with a population of more than 114,000 residents. It is 45 miles west of Detroit and 35 miles north of the Ohio border. A pleasant drive along country roads in any direction will lead to one historic and charming town after another including Bridgewater, Chelsea, Dexter and Saline which are all within a thirty minute drive of the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.  

Primary access to Ann Arbor is via three expressways including the I-94, US-23 and M-14. The I-94 runs east-west along the southern edge of the city as part of its route between Detroit and Chicago. US-23 runs north-south along the western and northern edges of the city, as part the major route between Ohio and northern Michigan. M-14 runs along the northern edge of the city and then travels east into the western suburbs of Detroit. The mean travel time to work is 19 minutes and bumper-to-bumper traffic is unheard of.  

Ypsilanti is 9 miles southeast, Toledo is 43 miles south while Chicago is 240 miles west and an easy four- hour drive on US Interstate 94. 

TRANSPORTATION/AIRPORTS 

Residents enjoy a plethora of easy and convenient ways to get around the Ann Arbor area. Roads are excellent, traffic is manageable, bus and train service is exceptional and several easy-to-use airports are located throughout the region. 

Primary access to Ann Arbor is via three expressways including the I-94, US-23 and M-14. The I-94 runs east-west along the southern edge of the city as part of its route between Detroit and Chicago. US-23 runs north-south along the western and northern edges of the city, as part the major route between Ohio and northern Michigan. M-14 runs along the northern edge of the city and then travels east into the western suburbs of Detroit. 

Detroit Metro Airport (DTW), the eighth busiest airport in the nation, serves Ann Arbor. Located in nearby Romulus, off the I-94, Metro Airport is about 25 miles east of Ann Arbor. It is the major hub of Northwest Airlines, which carries approximately seventy-five percent of the passengers traveling in and out of the Detroit Metro Area. Easy and convenient commuter flights to major cities in the Northeast Region and along the East Coast are also available from nearby airports in Flint and Lansing. 

Local private air service is available through Ann Arbor Airport, accommodating both airplanes as well as helicopters while cargo service is available through Willow Run Airport, which sprawls across the Washtenaw-Wayne county border and is the third busiest air cargo terminal in the U.S. 

Passenger rail service to Ann Arbor is provided via Amtrak, with a station located right in the heart of the city, which is the one stop in the county on the route between Detroit and Chicago. Amtrak's Michigan Services trains run throughout the state and connect Michigan to Illinois and Ohio. Michigan Services cover Chicago, Grand Rapids, Port Huron, and the Detroit Region. Train routes for getting around Michigan include the Pere Marquette offering daily service between Grand Rapids and Chicago, the Wolverine offering daily service between Pontiac and Chicago and the Blue Water offering daily service between Port Huron and Chicago. There are multiple departures daily from the Ann Arbor station with reserved coach and business class seating available. Freight service is available at the same station via the Ann Arbor Railroad. 

Local bus service is available through AATA - The Ride, which operates 110 buses throughout the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area picking up passengers at more than 1500 stops. The AATA operates two transit centers including the Blake Transit Center in downtown Ann Arbor on Fourth Avenue between William and Liberty and the Ypsilanti Transit Center, located on Pearl Street at Adams Street. Most Ann Arbor bus routes originate at the BTC at 15 minutes after and 15 minutes before each hour. The AATA has been acclaimed as the best mid-size transit authority in the country and the current fare is $1.00 for adults and 50 cents for children.  

Long-distance bus service to Ann Arbor is provided via the Greyhound station in the city and campus bus service for University of Michigan students, faculty and staff is provided free via the U of M Bus System. Local taxi service is available from Ann Arbor Taxi and shuttle service from Metro Airport is provided by Commuter Express vans. 

BRIEF HISTORY 

In 1823, a group of pioneers traveled along the banks of the Huron River in search of a location for a new frontier community. Among the settlers were John Allen and Elisha Rumsey who pushed 40 miles east through the Michigan Territory in February of 1824. Some forty miles west of Detroit, in the slopes that bounded the Huron River, these two pioneers established their settlement after purchasing 480 and 160 acres each from the Federal Government at $1.25 cents per acre for a total of $800. 

They named their new settlement Annarbour in honor of their wives, both of whose names included Ann and because the word Arbor (or "arbour" according to Allen's spelling) best described this new town of great Burr oaks and thick, lush vegetation.  

The town’s name quickly morphed into Ann Arbor and tragically Rumsey died in 1827 but Allen eventually became the town's postmaster, newspaper publisher, village president and all-around promoter. Ann Arbor became the seat of Washtenaw County in 1827, was incorporated in 1833, and chartered in 1851, which was also the year that John Allen died. 

Several mills, a tannery and a general store flourished in the settlement. The general store, or tavern, depending on which source you accept was painted bright red and the corner of Huron and Main on which it stood became known as Bloody Corners. In 1836, Ann Arbor lost a bid to be established as the state capital but the following year won its bid to be the new location of the University of Michigan when it offered forty acres of land free for the site. Only two years later it became a major regional transportation hub when the Michigan Central Railroad arrived..  

In 1852, Eastern Michigan University was formed in Ypsilanti, becoming the first teachers college outside the 13 colonies. Along with the U of M, these institutions served, as the focal point for the development of what has become one of the leading medical research and technology centers in the world where many corporations and businesses came to make their home. 

Ann Arbor became home first to large numbers of German immigrants, particularly from the state of Württemberg and escapees from the Great Irish Famine, though Canadians accounted for the largest percentage of immigrants during most of the 19th century. 

During World War I, Germans became targets of animosity because of their alleged sympathy for their native country and four professors in the U of M’s German department were dismissed. During World War II, Ford Motor Company’s nearby Willow Run plant turned out B-24 Liberator bombers and the population of Ann Arbor exploded with an influx of miltary personnel, war workers and their families. 

In 1960, Ann Arbor was the site of major speeches by both major presidential candidates, John Kennedy and Richard Nixon. President Kennedy outlined his proposal for what would become the Peace Corps at the Michigan Union on October 14, 1960 and on May 22, 1964, in memory of the slain president, President Lyndon Johnson unveiled his Great Society initiative during a University of Michigan commencement address. 

During the 1960s, Ann Arbor was one of the first major cities to embrace both the civil rights movement and the anti-Vietnam War movement. It was the site of the first major meeting of Students for a Democratic Society in 1960 and after a number of protests and an extensive public campaign, the city passed its first fair housing ordinance in 1963. 

Between 1972 and 1976, the city council went through a period in which members of the Human Rights Party got elected and fought for several measures that at the time seemed radical, including a rent control ordinance. In 1973, Kathy Kozachenko was elected to the Ann Arbor City Council and became the first openly gay candidate to run successfully for elected office in the United States. 

The economy of Ann Arbor has undergone a gradual shift from a manufacturing base to a service and technology base over the course of the 20th century, a shift which accelerated in the 1970s and 1980s. Ann Arbor now prides itself as home to 25 research centers and libraries. 

Modern and progressive yet imbued with the traditional values of family, community and faith in the limitless possibilities of education, Ann Arbor remains a cutting edge city embracing the future. 

ABOUT EDUCATION 

The Ann Arbor Public School District consists of 21 elementary schools, five middle schools, and three high schools with another major high school planned. There are currently 16,724 students enrolled in AAPS schools and students do above average in the Michigan Educational Assessment Program as well other standardized tests. There is strong parental involvement, caring teachers, competent administration and the resources of the Univeristy of Michigan to augment educational opportunity. There are also more than ten private, elementary and middle schools as well as five private high schools serving both religious and secular needs in Ann Arbor as well. 

Ann Arbor is home to the University of Michigan, one of the most distinguished universities in the world and a leader in higher education. It is one of only two public institutions consistently ranked in the nation's top ten universities and boasts of one of the largest health care complexes in the world, the best university library system in the country and the some of the best computer access for students and faculty of any campus in the world. Over 5,500 undergraduate courses are taught each term in over 100 programs. Undergraduate, graduate and professional students have a choice of 17 separate schools and colleges, 588 majors, over 600 student organizations, 350 concerts and recitals every year, as well as hundreds of speakers, symposia, films, and readings, many of which may also be attended by members of the Ann Arbor community. 

Other local colleges and universities include Washtenaw Community College, Cleary College, Concordia College and Eastern Michigan University in nearby Ypsilanti with a renowned teacher-training program. There are also two massage schools, two travel and tech schools and even an international business and language institute. 

DEXTER 

Nestled along the banks of the Huron River, the Village of Dexter is a friendly town of almost 2,800 residents located just minutes from the City of Ann Arbor, home of the premier University of Michigan. There are lovely family homes set in a classic small town environment where neighbors are friendly, schools are first rate, recreational opportunities abound and exciting attractions beckon. 

In addition to four community parks located within the Village offering children’s playgrounds, sports courts and picnic pavilions, there are two river parks including Dexter Huron and Hudson Mills. Dexter Huron is a wooded 122-acre park with a baseball diamond and three reservable riverfront picnic shelters while Hudson Mills is a 1600-acre wooded area with picnic areas, an 18-hole golf course, a 48-hole disc golf course, play fields, a children's play area, nature trails and even a paved hike and bike trail.  

Two local Washtenaw County Parks offer activities year round including canoeing, swimming, fishing, and cross-country skiing. There are 5 cross-country ski parks in the area and summer offers lake beaches at Big Portage Lake and Independence Lake. Half Moon Lake and Silver Lake have public beaches open all year long. 

Take part in a well-organized community recreation program offered by the Dexter Parks Department. Play softball, basketball, volleyball and baseball, there are also swimming classes for adults and children. The more adventurous can get their thrills at the Extreme Sport Palace, a 24,000 square foot facility featuring two extreme-skating areas, one for younger/beginner skaters and one for more advanced skaters. Runners can join in on the Dexter-Ann Arbor Run hosted by the Ann Arbor Track Club. Run a marathon relay or take part in 5k events. 

Stroll away the afternoon in Dexter where there's a passion for preserving and enjoying history and sharing it with the contemporary world. Downtown Dexter boasts boutiques, shops and restaurants that complement its charming, turn-of-the-century architecture but it’s all about enjoying the present away from city traffic and indoor malls.  

There are eight local churches, a local history museum and thriving festivals and fun family activities. Town events include everything from performing arts festivals to country fairs. Don’t miss the yearly Dexter Pioneer Arts Fair, held each March when 100 artisans demonstrate and sell their traditional and ethnic crafts. Learn about quilting, rug hooking, woodcarving, lace making, calligraphy, basket weaving, stained glass, silk painting, jewellery making and purchase one-of-a-kind articles from their makers. 

There’s an annual town clean up that brings people together to keep the village beautiful and Dexter Daze is an annual summer favourite offering a weekend of family-fun. Unfolding the first weekend in August, this festival offers arts and crafts, food vendors, children's entertainment, a parade and evening entertainment.  

The Webster Fall Festival takes place on the spacious grounds of the Webster Township Historical Society and new Webster Township Hall. The day's events include pioneer craft demonstrations, a township-wide rummage/antique sale, country store, country craft show, pig roast as well as a display of antique cars and tractors. The year closes with the Dexter Victorian Christmas on the first two Saturdays in December when everyone goes carolling, you can take a sleigh rides and a photo with Santa all followed by a Holiday Light Parade. 

Warm and inviting with a year round roster of exciting activities and places to discover, live the good life in the Village of Dexter. 

LOCATION 

Located in Washtenaw County, the Village of Dexter is set in the scenic southeast corner of Michigan. While it is considered a bedroom community of nearby Ann Arbor, Dexter respects its rural roots and takes every effort to preserve its small town atmosphere and its surrounding open space. It is surrounded by lakes including the Silver, Half Moon, North and West Lakes and touched by part of Four Mile, Portage and Base Lakes offering fabulous water views, recreational activities and living. Portage Lake is known as the "Saratoga of Michigan", named for the famous resort in New York. 

Dexter is situated north on Baker road, just off the I-94 and bounded on the east by US-23 and on the west M-106. Ann Arbor and the renowned University of Michigan is 10 miles south, Saline is 13 miles north, Detroit and its big city attractions are 50 miles east and an easy hour drive on the I-94 while Toledo is 45 miles south on US-23. Chicago is 270 miles to the west on the I-94 and about a three-and-a-half hour drive. 

TRANSPORTATION/AIRPORTS 

Primary highway access to Dexter is via the I-94, Baker Road and Dexter-Pinckney Road. I-94 runs east-west, just south of the village, as part of its route between Detroit and Chicago. Baker Road runs south from the village, past I-94 to Jackson Road. Dexter-Pinckney Road runs west and then north from the village, into Livingston County. 

Dexter is served by Detroit Metro Airport (DTW), located in Romulus, off the I-94, 50 miles east. DTW is the eighth busiest airport in the US and the major hub of Northwest Airlines, which carries approximately seventy-five percent of the passengers traveling in and out of the Detroit Metro Area. Easy and convenient commuter flights to major cities in the Northeast Region and along the East Coast are also available from nearby airports in Flint and Lansing. 

Local private air service is available through Ann Arbor Airport, accommodating both private aircraft as well as helicopters while cargo service is available through Willow Run Airport, which sprawls across the Washtenaw-Wayne county border and is the third busiest air cargo terminal in the U.S. 

Passenger rail service is provided via Amtrak, with a station located right in the heart of nearby Ann Arbor, which is the one stop in the county on the route between Detroit and Chicago. Amtrak's Michigan Services trains pass through the Ann Arbor Station on runs throughout the state and also connect the area conveniently to Illinois and Ohio. Michigan Services cover Chicago, Grand Rapids, Port Huron, and the Detroit Region. Train routes for getting around Michigan include the Pere Marquette offering daily service between Grand Rapids and Chicago, the Wolverine offering daily service between Pontiac and Chicago and the Blue Water offering daily service between Port Huron and Chicago. There are multiple departures daily from the Ann Arbor station with reserved coach and business class seating available. Freight service is available at the same station via the Ann Arbor Railroad. 

Local bus service is available through AATA - The Ride, which operates 110 buses throughout the Ann Arbor area including Dexter, picking up passengers at more than 1500 stops. The AATA operates two transit centers including the Blake Transit Center in downtown Ann Arbor and the Ypsilanti Transit Center. Most bus routes originate at the BTC at 15 minutes after and 15 minutes before each hour. The AATA has been acclaimed as the best mid-size transit authority in the country and the current fare is $1.00 for adults and 50 cents for children.  

Long-distance bus service is provided via the Greyhound station in Ann Arbor, local taxi service is available from Ann Arbor Taxi and shuttle service from Metro Airport is provided by Commuter Express vans. 

BRIEF HISTORY 

While Native American tribes had lived in the area for thousands of years, the first settlers to Dexter came mainly from New York. Judge Samuel Dexter, scion of a very prominent Massachusetts family, founded the Village of Dexter in 1824 after he purchased the land where the Dover Mills were located. Shortly afterwards, several families joined him and there came to be a sense that they were building a permanent community. Two years later, Dexter became the first postmaster and soon after the first town meeting was held in his home in 1827 and the town’s land was officially plotted. By 1830 Dexter was a township and a school was established and in 1855, it officially incorporated as a village. 

The early settlers farmed wheat; corn, barley, oats, clover and apples were grown in all parts of the township. The farms in the area were renowned for producing the best and greatest varieties of apples in the country. 

Up until 1832 the original Township of Dexter governed the entire western half of Washtenaw County, plus parts of Jackson and Livingston Counties. This land that would later become Dexter, Scio, Webster, Lima, Freedom, Bridgewater, Manchester, Sharon, Sylvan, and Lyndon Townships. 

Dexter was a hotbed of support for the abolition of slavery as well as a stop on the Underground Railroad. Judge Dexter’s wife Millicent Dexter and many other local women were very active in helping slaves to escape to freedom.  

By the latter part of the 19th century the Village had several hotels, a very large flourmill, woollen mill, saw mill, grist mill, boat company, blacksmith shops, buggy factories, cabinet shops and several manufacturing concerns. The 125-year-old cider mill still operates in the fall of each year. 

A Masonic Lodge and Opera House were built for plays, speeches and other entertainments. The railroad trestle leading out of town to the west was built by the first black engineer of the Michigan Central Railroad, as was the 150-year-old railroad bridge in Warrior Park, located just behind the present fire station.  

The Business District grew on Main Street, which still retains window ornamentation and icons typical of architecture in the 19th century. The building still located on the corner of Main and Broad streets in the heart of the Village is one of the few buildings left in Michigan that is covered with its original tin.  

Many beautiful churches and Victorian homes were constructed in Dexter the late 19th and early 20th centuries as Dexter evolved into the classic midwestern small town and an ideal place for comfortable family living.  

The Village of Dexter continues to be supported by a diverse economy plus its proximity to Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan gives it a cosmopolitan allure uncommon for such a sweet, small town. Be sure to visit the wonderful Dexter Historical Museum that contains many interesting items unique to local history and interprets the Village’s progress from mill town to small town to desirable suburban community. 

ABOUT EDUCATION 

Dexter public schools serve a student body of 3,500 with one high school, two middle schools, one for grades 5-6 and the other for grades 7-8 and two elementary schools, one for k-2 and the other for grades 3-4. School facilities are modern and recently renovated and the curriculum includes math, science, social studies and language arts integrated into each day. Physical education, art, music, life skills, and technology programs are also available to every student on a six-week rotational basis.  

Students with special needs are offered a variety of support services, such as special education, child study, counselling and individualized programming. Recent academic highlights include a grant to the district to implement an after school program to provide academic assistance to students who struggle, although most students in the district exceed the state average on standardized tests. 

Dexter High School students’ accomplishments include the highest test scores in the area on the MEAP tests. Dexter High ACT scores averaged 23.7 compared with a state average of 21.4 and the national average 20.9. The Dexter High School Band has also been rated number one in every state competition.

Nearby Ann Arbor is home to the University of Michigan, one of the most distinguished universities in the world and a leader in higher education. It is one of only two public institutions consistently ranked in the nation's top ten universities and boasts of one of the largest health care complexes in the world, the best university library system in the country and the some of the best computer access for students and faculty of any campus in the world.  

Over 5,500 undergraduate courses are taught each term in over 100 programs. Undergraduate, graduate and professional students have a choice of 17 separate schools and colleges, 588 majors, over 600 student organizations, 350 concerts and recitals every year, as well as hundreds of speakers, symposia, films, and readings, many of which may also be attended by members of community as well. The University of Michigan is a vital part of the life of region and its worldwide reputation draws people from all parts of the globe creating a thrilling cosmopolitan mix that infuses the area with diversity. And cheering on the University of Michigan sports teams, especially the football team is a local tradition. 

Other nearby colleges and universities include Washtenaw Community College, Cleary College and Concordia College in Ann Arbor as well as Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti with a renowned teacher-training program. 

SALINE 

Named after natural salt springs found in this area, Saline is home to several antique stores and the well-known Ann Arbor Antiques Market. Buyers and sellers from around the United States attend the monthly market at the Washtenaw Farm Council Grounds, located 3 miles north of downtown Saline. Over 350 dealers bring their wares to this show known for its quality antiques and select collectibles. 

Visitors arriving in Saline from the east are welcomed by the stately presence of the Davenport-Curtiss Mansion built in 1870 by one of the town's early entrepreneurs. Other elegant examples of Post Revolutionary, Victorian and Classic American homes can be found on North Ann Arbor, Monroe and Henry Streets. 

The Saline motto is, "Saline--Proud of our past and confident of our future." Saline is a growing community with small town character, but immediate access to big city services. Saline was chosen by Money Magazine as one of the most attractive small cities in America.  

With a current population of more than 8,000, Saline provides a variety of local employment opportunities for its citizens, an excellent school system for its children and a strong tax base that keeps city services first-rate. In addition, Saline has a top-notch local hospital, an impressive array of community organizations including an active Chamber of Commerce as well eight churches.

More than two dozen different industries make their home in Saline including many high tech employers as well as farm product manufacturers. 50% of the US population and 30% of the population of Canada are within 500 miles as well as 54% of all US manufacturing activity and 48% of US retail sales. 

Local attractions include the Bixby Marionette Exhibit, the Depot Museum, the Rentschler Farm Museum and the Saline Historical Society Museum. Enjoy yearly festivals such as the Saline Celtic Festival or take in a play performed by the Saline Area Players, now in their 31st year. 

Ann Arbor, one of America's fastest growing high-technology cities and home to the renowned University of Michigan is just a ten-minute drive away. The U of M is world famous for its research facilities, medical and business schools, cultural attractions and winning sports teams that do battle in the nation’s largest collegiate stadium. Visit museums, shops, restaurants and of course cheer on the University of Michigan Football team. 

Saline is a family community that celebrates its agricultural roots and places a premium on its traditional heritage. The values of family, faith, hard work, self-reliance and independence still imbue the spirit of the city, filling its citizenry with pride in their community. 

LOCATION 

Picturesque Saline is located in Washtenaw County in the southeastern corner of Michigan. It is considered part of the greater Ann Arbor metropolitan area and has a land area of just under five square miles. Set on the shores of the Saline River, it is a scenic and wonderful place to live and work.  

It is a region of lakes, forests and fertile farmland and the heart of an area that is rapidly growing while still protecting its natural environment. Saline is strategically located in southern Michigan's booming east-west metropolitan corridor. Combining the best aspects of small town life with the progressive attitude of a growing city, Saline is proud of its past and optimistic about its future.  

Saline is set along US-12 which runs which runs north-south through the city as part of its route between Detroit and Chicago. US-23 runs north-south, just a few miles west of the city, as part of one of the major routes between Ohio and northern Michigan. The I-94, the major interstate highway that serves the region, runs east-west, just a few miles north of the city as part of its route between Detroit and Chicago. 

Ann Arbor, one of America's fastest growing high-technology cities and home to the renowned University of Michigan is just a ten-minute drive away. The charming Village of Dexter is 19 miles northwest, about a 25 minute drive on the I-94 while the big city attractions of Detroit are only 45 miles away and a quick hour drive east on the I-94. Toledo is 45 miles south down the US-23 and fabulous Chicago is 250 miles west, and an easy 4-hour drive along the I-94. 

TRANSPORTATION/AIRPORTS 

Saline is ideally located in the southeastern corner of Michigan and sits at the center of a modern transportation infrastructure that includes well-maintained roads and bridges, superbly integrated public transportation and easy to use trains and convenient airports. 

Saline is set along US-12 which runs which runs north-south through the city as part of its route between Detroit and Chicago. US-23 runs north-south, just a few miles west of the city, as part of one of the major routes between Ohio and northern Michigan. The I-94, the major interstate highway that serves the region, runs east-west, just a few miles north of the city as part of its route between Detroit and Chicago. 

Detroit Metro Airport (DTW), located in Romulus, off the I-94, 45 miles east, serves Saline. DTW is the eighth busiest airport in the US and the major hub of Northwest Airlines, which carries approximately seventy-five percent of the passengers traveling in and out of the Detroit Metro Area. Easy and convenient commuter flights to major cities in the Northeast Region and along the East Coast are also available from the airport in Toledo, Ohio. 

Local private air service is available through Ann Arbor Airport, accommodating both private aircraft as well as helicopters. Cargo service is available through Willow Run Airport, which sprawls across the Washtenaw-Wayne County border and is the third busiest air cargo terminal in the U.S. 

Passenger rail service is provided via Amtrak, with a station located right in the heart of nearby Ann Arbor. Ann Arbor is the only stop in Washtenaw County on the route between Detroit and Chicago and is just ten minutes away. Amtrak's Michigan Services trains pass through the Ann Arbor Station on runs throughout the state and also connect the area conveniently to Illinois and Ohio. Michigan Services cover Chicago, Grand Rapids, Port Huron, and the Detroit Region. Train routes for getting around Michigan include the Pere Marquette offering daily service between Grand Rapids and Chicago, the Wolverine offering daily service between Pontiac and Chicago and the Blue Water offering daily service between Port Huron and Chicago. There are multiple departures daily from the Ann Arbor station with reserved coach and business class seating available. Freight service is available at the same station via the Ann Arbor Railroad. 

Local bus service is available through AATA - The Ride, which operates 110 buses throughout the Ann Arbor area including Saline, picking up passengers at more than 1500 stops. The AATA operates two transit centers including the Blake Transit Center in downtown Ann Arbor and the Ypsilanti Transit Center. Most bus routes originate at the BTC at 15 minutes after and 15 minutes before each hour. The AATA has been acclaimed as the best mid-size transit authority in the country and the current fare is $1.00 for adults and 50 cents for children.  

Long-distance bus service is provided via the Greyhound station in Ann Arbor, local taxi service is available from Ann Arbor Taxi and shuttle service from Metro Airport is provided by Commuter Express vans. 

BRIEF HISTORY 

Salt has been a valued commodity throughout history. As essential to our Indian predecessors, who established no less than six well-defined trails to the salt wells along the Saline River, south of the site of modern day Saline, as it was to the first European settlers drawn to the area for its natural riches.  

Saline's first permanent settler was Leonard Miller in 1826, following closely was Orange Risdon who purchased the land for $200 and surveyed Saline village in 1832. Mr. Risdon officially named the village Saline because of the salt wells and is honored today as the town’s founder. He died Nov. 27, 1876 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery. 

Soon he was joined by others who settled along the river because it was an ideal site for a mill. A sawmill was constructed and soon after a gristmill. Risdon built his home on a hill at the western edge of his property, along the Detroit and Chicago Road.  

This was an ideal site for a city, where main north-south roads to Ann Arbor, Tecumseh and Monroe intersected. In 1832, Risdon laid out six city blocks, three north and three south of "Chicago Street" (which is now Michigan Avenue). This was intersected by "Adrian Street" (now North and South Ann Arbor) and bounded on the west by the "original" Monroe Street and by 1838 Saline was a real town. Later town additions including the areas of Risdon, Mills and Bennett ere added, the last after the railroad was built through Saline.  

Saline was settled chiefly by New Yorkers who came via the Erie Canal, then by boat across the Great Lakes to either Detroit or Monroe. They were drawn to the new territory for its fertile land, dense forests for buildings and fuel and the river for power. The Saline River was then large enough for canoes and small boats to travel from Lake Erie via the Raisin River.  

The Risdon home served as an inn for several years, with all travellers welcome when darkness fell. The first post office was in the Risdon home as well and Risdon himself was the first postmaster and served for ten years.  

A man named Silas Finch came from New York to start a store, and because no other building was available, Risdon rented him the parlour, so the Risdon home served as the first store as well. Finch later built the first store in the village, now the site of the Saline Savings Bank. Risdon was Justice of the Peace for twelve years and officiated at the first wedding in town and the first election was held in his home as well.  

Risdon was generous with his property and gave land for the first church, a Baptist one. He also donated land for the first Methodist Church as well as the first school. The village grew, supported by very productive surrounding farmland and by farmers who depended on the village for supplies.  

Significant growth was spurred on by Schuyler Haywood's construction of his mill at a fall in the Saline River. The result was growth of an industrial" area featuring mills, an ashery, blacksmith, hardware store and tin shop. The residential area, which developed just west, became known as Barnegat and the boundary of Saline moved west when this area became the first formal addition to the city in 1848. The village was incorporated on October 18, 1866. 

The town boomed when the railroad arrived in 1870 offering the farmers a way to ship their products including grain and cattle. Construction of the Detroit, Hillsdale and Indiana railroad spurred expansion of the city north into Lodi Township. Less than a year later, the town expanded including Bennett's Addition along the trackside while Mills Addition filled in the western area between the original settlement. Saline had now become an agricultural shipping center and in 1899 the electric car "Maude" made travel to Ypsilanti and points east even more convenient.  

By the turn of the century it was claimed that among the villages of Michigan, Saline could not be surpassed in beauty of location, regularity of streets or in the neatness of its commercial and dwelling houses. The people of the town were called “progressionists” who seizes on every opportunity to build up the interest of the town. The built business blocks, school buildings, churches and lovely homes. The business center of the village presented a busy scene and Saline was called, “one of the most pleasant little centers of population in Michigan." It has remained so to this day. 

Saline became an official city in 1931 but continued to protect, preserve and enhance its comfortable, small-town character. Saline has kept up to date with new banks, high schools, hospitals, recreational parks, industrial park, churches and housing. Good planning and the blending together of the ancestors of early pioneers with the residents and companies drawn to Saline by its quiet history and charm has maintained a quality of life that would make the village founders of 1866 proud.  

Today the character of Saline is an extension of the community's agricultural roots, whose heritage puts a premium on traditional values, hard work, self-reliance, independence, and an enduring pride in one's community, family and job. Strategically located in southern Michigan's booming east-west metropolitan corridor, combining the best aspects of small town life with the progressive attitude of a growing city, Saline's history is unique and its future prospects are unrivalled. 

ABOUT EDUCATION 

Saline has a public school system that sets high achievement goals for its students and boast many new facilities added within the last 3 years. There is one high school, one middles school and 5 elementary schools as well as a preschool program and an alternative learning program. The Saline Christian School, which offers class from prekindergarten through twelfth grade, is the only private school in town. 

The public school system is dedicated to, “…a consistency of purpose with a focus on providing educational experiences which meet or exceed World Class Standards.” The district prides itself on responsiveness to the needs of students, parents, community, business and industry and on creating a learning organization where all employees are supported and encouraged to continue to attain new knowledge and skills and constantly enhance their knowledge base.  

A brand new high school opened in Fall 2004 and it is one of the largest and most modernly appointed high school facilities in the state. The current student enrolment is just over 1600, but the new building has capacity for just over 2000 so there’s plenty of room for the town to welcome new residents and their children and continue to grow into the future.  

The building is fully compliant with Americans with Disabilities regulations and instructional features include classrooms designed with two distinct hallways on each of the three floors providing flexibility to place students in smaller groupings that provide a more intimate learning environment. In addition to computer technology classrooms and labs, there are five mobile laptop labs which can be rolled anywhere in the building to instantly provide a computer lab for specific learning activities. Wifi hotspots are also planned throughout the building. 

Nearby Ann Arbor is home to the University of Michigan, one of the most distinguished universities in the world and a leader in higher education. It is one of only two public institutions consistently ranked in the nation's top ten universities and boasts of one of the largest health care complexes in the world, the best university library system in the country and the some of the best computer access for students and faculty of any campus in the world.  

Over 5,500 undergraduate courses are taught each term in over 100 programs. Undergraduate, graduate and professional students have a choice of 17 separate schools and colleges, 588 majors, over 600 student organizations, 350 concerts and recitals every year, as well as hundreds of speakers, symposia, films, and readings, many of which may also be attended by members of community as well. The University of Michigan is a vital part of the life of region and its worldwide reputation draws people from all parts of the globe creating a thrilling cosmopolitan mix that infuses the area with diversity. And cheering on the University of Michigan sports teams, especially the football team is a local tradition. 

Other nearby colleges and universities include Washtenaw Community College, Cleary College and Concordia College in Ann Arbor as well as Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti with a renowned teacher-training program. 
Nancy Bishop
Nancy Bishop
Associate Broker